PMP methodology & wind farm project management

This week I had the pleasure to pass the PMP (Project Management Professional) exam – one of the two leading certifications for project managers, the other being PRINCE2 from the UK. The exam itself is notoriously not trivial: long (200 questions in 4 hours) and based on a book very hard to read, the Project Management Body of Knowledge (“PMBoK”).

In general I would recommend it, as it provide a solid methodology together with a broad suit of concepts, tools and techniques. On top of that, a great number of terms are defined in detail and this alone is a great benefit as this facilitate the interaction with other professionals providing a common language.

Said that, and totally aware of the fact that this type of methodologies are conceived to be “not industry specific”, I believe that there are many relevant difference between the PMP concept and the way wind farm project management is today, at least seen through the eyes of Project Managers (PM) working for wind turbine manufacturers or Main Contractors.

To give some example, one of the first steps in the PMP standard is the creation of a business case for the project.  This is something that you will hardly see in wind farm construction – maybe the wind farm developer has a business case, but the company building the wind farm is selling a product (the wind turbine) and some services (BoP, installation, maintenance). No need for business justifications, this is the core business.

Additionally, in the PMP methodology the PM should start to define the scope, the deliverables, the cost baseline, etc. I believe that in general the wind industry the PM receive all this inputs from the Sales Manager and/or Tender Manager, and even if there are always open points and deliverables that need to be defined more in detail this is not the main focus of the PM.

I have also rarely seen in wind farm construction a change management system as developed as the one in the PMP standard. I do however recognize that it has a lot of sense, providing a uniformity and a logic in the way changes are analysed and approved or rejected.

Finally yet importantly, the current version of PMP (sixth edition) include a variety of Agile Development concepts. These are more relevant in software development and similar environments: onshore wind farm construction is a business where these evolutionary development and adaptive planning techniques do not usually find opportunities to be used.

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About Francesco Miceli

Hello! My name is Francesco and I'm a civil engineer specialized in EPC (that is, "turnkey") wind farms projects. I'm currently based in Hamburg, Germany and I'm developing several interesting project all around the world - southern Europe, LATAM and various other countries. If you want to contact me please don't leave a comment in the blog (I don't check them very often) - you can use the contact form. You can write me in English, Spanish and Italian. To find a (somewhat concise) description of my non-wind business activities you can visit my webpage - www.francescomiceli.com If you want to know more about my work, here you can download my CV - www.windfarmbop.com/CV_Francesco_Miceli.pdf Hope you like the blog! Francesco

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