Wind farm project management: PRICE2 vs PMP

In another post I have discussed my experience with the PMP certification and its (somehow weak) relationship with wind farm project management.

In a nutshell, several processes and concepts are not directly applicable given the peculiarity of our industry. Said that, I believe that the PMP has a value, because it explain in detail a lot of tools and ideas that are used daily – for instance dependency types in Gantt charts, how to handle risk management or the “stakeholder management” concept.

Some days ago I have made another PM certification, the British de facto standard PRINCE2. The main reason for that has been my curiosity to see another point of view on a very broad topic such as project management.

Both certifications are trying to live together and differentiate themselves:

  • PMP define itself as a “standard” and comes with a mountain of processes and techniques.
  • PRINCE2 define itself as a “methodology”, coming with models and templates but very few techniques.

My personal impression is that the role of the Project Manager in PRICE2 is less relevant compared to the PMP idea of the same role – basically he has some decision margins, but he’s somehow squeezed between the Project Board making the big decisions and the teams doing the actual job. As soon as one of the tolerance levels is exceeded, he need to escalate the problem to the Project Board (that in the wind industry, if it exist, is usually called “Steering Committee” or something similar).

This image is strikingly different from the one that my mentor Luis Miguel gave me when he told me that, in the infancy of the wind industry, the PM was basically “the God of construction site”. Possibly the image is a bit strong but it makes the concept crystal clear.

Said that I also had the feeling that PRINCE2 was much easier to follow in the definition of the workflow, with less processes (seven) clearly linked between them and few key concepts (“Themes” and “Principles”). Understanding the relationship between the 49 processes of PMP is not that easy: I had to print them in a huge A0 and spend a lot of time staring at it to make a sense of them.

An interesting argument that I want to mention against PRINCE2 is that it is “unfalsifiable”, in the scientific sense defined by Karl Popper. This basically means that PRINCE2 has to be tailored (that is, adapted) to the specific project to work properly. If something goes wrong, you cannot proof that the problem is PRINCE2 (because possibly the tailoring you have made was wrong).

In conclusion I would recommend both certification to people interested in knowing more about project management, even if some tools, techniques and processes are not used in wind farms construction.

This entry was posted in General and tagged , , , by Francesco Miceli. Bookmark the permalink.

About Francesco Miceli

Hello! My name is Francesco and I'm a civil engineer specialized in EPC (that is, "turnkey") wind farms projects. I'm currently based in Hamburg, Germany and I'm developing several interesting project all around the world - southern Europe, LATAM and various other countries. If you want to contact me please don't leave a comment in the blog (I don't check them very often) - you can use the contact form. You can write me in English, Spanish and Italian. To find a (somewhat concise) description of my non-wind business activities you can visit my webpage - www.francescomiceli.com If you want to know more about my work, here you can download my CV - www.windfarmbop.com/CV_Francesco_Miceli.pdf Hope you like the blog! Francesco

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *